Value Line

Many of you may remember the SavvyInterview I conducted with Mr. Andy Rutter.  I recently received a personal letter from Mr. Rutter in which he continued to share sage advice. He started the letter with a little Shakespeare in noting Polonius’ advice to his son Laertes, “Neither a borrower nor a lender be, For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.”  

In the middle pat of the letter, Mr. Rutter noted that he would recommend Value Line to gain insight into potential stock selection.  I am passing that recommendation along to SavvyReaders.  The Value Line Investment Survey® is available through print or online subscriptions at a rate of $598 annually.  Fortunately however, many libraries carry the survey. A SavvyReader would be well advised to contact or visit their local public library to see if they carry the survey.  Gaining free access, paid for through your taxes, is definitely the way to go.

As noted on the Value Line site, the survey serves as a comprehensive, multifaceted investment management solution used by both individual and professional investors to conduct basic research, formulate sound investment strategies, identify timely opportunities and make smart investment decisions.  The surveys are delivered in three sections updated weekly, more frequently online.

Ratings and Reports: Each week, a selection of full-page stock reports with updated analysis on approximately 130 stocks in a handful of industries, presented on a rotating basis such that all of the Value Line 1,700 companies are covered each 13-week quarter. Each page pinpoints current and historic financial data, detailed financial results, 3-5 year price and earnings projections, charts, rankings, forward-looking, objective analyst commentaries, and more.

Summary & Index: An excellent, wide-angle overview of the Value Line universe covering summary information on all stocks in the Investment Survey, plus statistics and screens; the ability to drill down to a select group of stocks based on pre-set screens; and, a look ahead at Value Line’s “Hypothesized Economic Environment.”

Selection & Opinion: Current economic and market statistics and forecasts, examinations of various “story stocks,” and Standard model portfolios.

He closed the letter with a personal observation.  “My generation is the richest in history, but all one hears about are those who are in financial difficulty.  I believe that financially, we are the norm, not the exception.  I grew up during the Depression.  I have been rich and I have been poor.  Rich is better.”

James
 

James retired in 2005 after serving 21 years in the United States Army. During the latter part of his career, James' interest in personal finance was piqued based on his own experiences and observations of the way most Americans plan – or more accurately, fail to plan – for retirement and the difficulty many face in starting the process. His most valued education has been lessons learned from personal experience and through conversations with smart, savvy friends.

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