Simple Money – A SavvyReview

Simple Money A No-Nonsense Guide To Personal Finance

Paperback: 288 pages

Publisher: Baker Books (March 1, 2016)

ISBN-10:0801018862 | ISBN-13: 978-0801018862

Whether you are taking your first step or you are well ahead on your pecuniary journey, Tim Maurer’s ‘Simple Money’ is a steady diet of kudos serving up great help in developing a financial plan.

Intersection of Money and Life

Much like the A Richer Understanding series here on RetirementSavvy, where we take a look at the non-technical side of money, Maurer believes most of our financial goals aren’t only financial goals, however life goals with financial implications. With an understanding; of ourselves, of our history with money and what we value the book then focuses on providing the framework for a richer understanding, alongside of reducing the stress associated with reaching those intersections of money and life.

 A Philosophy Of Enough

“The real point of investing is not actually to make money but to have a better life and facilitate Enough.”

The quote above is pulled from the chapter on investing. There have been great discussions on RetirementSavvyconcerning minimalism, living a simple life and the definition of wealth. In the same spirit as the sites tagline “living better through planning,” the philosophy of Simple Money becomes finding contentment by redefining wealth (for yourself) and the how and why this focus will improve your life.

Personal Finance is Actually More Personal Than it is Finance

We are all absolutely unique and what works well for someone may not work well for someone else. Tim Maurer has written an understandable and practical book with a personal approach to financial concepts.

The simple, not simplistic, message throughout Simple Money will assist many on their journeys; financial and life.

Simple Money: A No-Nonsense Guide to Personal Finance is available at Amazon in Kindle and Paperback formats.

James
 

James retired in 2005 after serving 21 years in the United States Army. During the latter part of his career, James' interest in personal finance was piqued based on his own experiences and observations of the way most Americans plan – or more accurately, fail to plan – for retirement and the difficulty many face in starting the process. His most valued education has been lessons learned from personal experience and through conversations with smart, savvy friends.

Click Here to Leave a Comment Below 0 comments

Leave a Reply: